Negotiating in the United States and Hong Kong

Tinsley, C H and Pillutla, M (1998) Negotiating in the United States and Hong Kong. Journal of International Business Studies, 29 (4). pp. 711-727. ISSN 00472506, 14786990

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Abstract

We propose that cultural values (self-enhancement, self-transcendence, conservatism, and openness to change) provide a social environment where some negotiation strategies are selected to survive over others. These selected negotiation strategies become normative. Results from a negotiation simulation in the United States and Hong Kong indicate that U.S. negotiators are more likely to subscribe to selfinterest and joint problem solving norms, and Hong Kong Chinese negotiators are more likely to subscribe to an equality norm. Further, U.S. negotiators report more satisfaction when they maximize joint gain and Hong Kong Chinese negotiators are happier when they achieve outcome parity. The reported norms and outcome evaluations are consistent with the value profiles of the two cultures. The implications of these cultural differences are discussed in terms of expanding U.S. based negotiation theory.

Affiliation: Indian School of Business
ISB Creiators:
ISB Creators
ORCiD
Pillutla, M
https://orcid.org/ 0000-0001-5529-5094
Item Type: Article
Additional Information: The research article was published by the author with the affiliation of London Business School
Uncontrolled Keywords: Negotiating, United States, Hong Kong
Subjects: Organization Behavior
Depositing User: Gurusrinivasan K
Date Deposited: 26 Sep 2021 17:30
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2021 17:30
URI: https://eprints.exchange.isb.edu/id/eprint/1580
Publisher URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/155406
Publisher OA policy: https://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publication/8340
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